Koukyuu Tomo Set

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Koukyuu Tomo Nagura Set

I collect and work with many different types of Japanese Natural Whetstones. For a long while, I’ve been collecting many different types of Tomo Nagura. Occasionally, when honing a straight razor, I’ll use a progression of slurries from several different Tomo on one Awasedo. This technique parallels the way we use Mikawa Shiro Nagura , and I find that it leaves a unique fingerprint on the resulting edge.

Having a progression of Nagura like this is, admittedly, a bit of a luxury. However, I believe it allows me to tap into the systems capabilities at a deeper level.

Shown in the photo above.. 

1 - Nakayama Iromono Tomae: 172 g, very large piece of perfect-hardness Iromono Nakayama. Just a bit of softness but still hard enough to make a killer straight razor finishing slurry. 


2 - Shobudani Asagi Tomae: 154 g, spot-on chunk of real Awasedo, harder than the Iromono but it still slurries easily on a harder stone. Super fine polisher. 


3 - Oozuku Mizu Asagi Awasedo: 78 g, very hard stone, makes an uber fine slurry on a very hard Honzan. On a softer stone it will kick up base stone fast. This is a super fine very hard stone. 


4 - Nakayama Kiita Namito: 85 g, very hard, very fine, very fast. I love to use this type of egg color Kiita Namito as a Tomo. The slurry is slow, and you must work it to death to get the smoothness out of it. I get incredible sharpness from these Tomo though, just brilliant. Working on a very hard stone is a non negotiable prerequisite. 


5 - Shinden Shiro Suita: 101 g, this one is pure unobtanium. Real Shiro Suita strata from Shinden. Was a broken stone and I cut it down to a few Tomo. This is a harder Suita, the slurry is very fast. and it can definitely finish the edge on a straight razor. 

© Keith V Johnson 2014 - 2015